Welcome to the India Study Circle

The aims of the India Study Circle for Philately are to promote study and research into the philatelic and postal history of India. This includes material from Burma (Myanmar), Pakistan, Bangladesh and all the Princely States. It also includes British Indian Post Offices located outside India and the posts of other European powers that held ground within it. Many of us include stamps and stamped paper issued within India to raise revenue by whatever fiscal means.

As well as the issue and use of stamps and postal stationery we study postal markings, postal rates and routes. These evidence the organisation and methods of operation of the postal administrations.

We cover Military Postal History from wherever the Indian Army has operated and set up postal communications; and from the British Army in India. A similar widespread scope defines Maritime Postal History and Aero-philately.

We try not to overlap the interests that our philatelic friends take in Pakistan, Nepal, Tibet, and Burma. They have their own specialist groups. Our German-speaking friends also have their German-language group.

The ISC provides an organisation that can help all interested to further research and knowledge, once they join and take part in its activities. Its aim is to promote research and to keep permanent records of as many different aspects of Indian philately and postal history as possible. We also make some great friendships.

The idea for an India Study Circle was founded in early 1950 with a ‘Notes and News’ by a Mr N J Mills, a stamp dealer from Eastbourne. After five editions of this newsletter both Mr Mills and ‘Notes and News’ disappeared without trace. The credit for re-forming of a new India Study Circle should go to Mr R A Killick of Brighton. The outcome was the publication of the ISC ‘News Sheet’ No. 1 in December 1951 announcing the names of 22 members. This list included the name of C T Sturton who was still on the membership roll in 2001.

By the end of 1952 membership had increased to 69 and this included the first members from U.S.A. Jal Cooper and Robson Lowe were to become the Society’s first honorary members.

After 1957 membership grew rapidly with many of the great Indian philatelists and postal historians playing pivotal roles in the Circle’s structure and organisation.

In January 1967, the ‘India Post’ was born and was, as stated by the editor, ‘dedicated to all those who had made the previous seventeen years of its forerunners possible’.

The mid-seventies showed contiued groth and the membership swelled to over 350 and by the second decade of the 21st century was close to 500. The India Study Circle continues to spearhead the most dedicated research into this most rewarding and colourful field of collecting.